Loose Endings in Memoir

In life we often have loose ends in our story. Nothing is really resolved. Things go on anyway. People come in and out of our life and we don’t do much to hold them because we are distracted or don’t care that much. Events come and go and we mean to participate again but we have a knee injury or time goes by too quickly to do it again. So much is started and drifts away. Much is said but not done. We are busy and let things be. We follow up on thoughts and ideas and sometimes, we don’t. In more recent  fiction this is shown and called an open endings toan event, thought, idea. We don’t know what happened to that person and what changed her mind. Continue reading “Loose Endings in Memoir” »

Writing Tips for Memoir: A Story in Time

When you are writing a story that takes place over a long period of time, be sure to let the reader know the timeline. They need to know when things are happening, how much time has passed, and what led up to the event. Don’t let the reader figure it out for herself. That’s too much work for the reader. Let the story bring her along in the flow of the story with a sense of time moving over skipped periods. You can start a list of transitional phrases to help the reader move smoothly to a new time. Add to the list as you think of more:

As time passed by I realized..

Once I realized ___, I could settle into __

For awhile, ..

Content to let my days be filled with__, I let time.. Continue reading “Writing Tips for Memoir: A Story in Time” »

Trust in the Way You Write: Your Style, Your Organization, Your Schedule

Writers like Toni Morrison or very poetic writers are interested in where “the golden thread is going.” It wouldn’t be fun to write if they knew everything they wanted to say. They write from a creative place and then review and take out digressions. This way of nonlinear writing is a flow from the subconscious and only certain personality types can work this way.

This kind of flowing writer needs help to stay on track and trust in their right brain function. In the United States, we have a left brain culture of goals and time lines of what comes first, second, third. It’s sometimes hard to believe in your way which is different. As we mature, we tend to be able to use both parts of our brain better and can do goals and light schedules and work from the creative part of our brain too. Continue reading “Trust in the Way You Write: Your Style, Your Organization, Your Schedule” »

Starting to Outline

I am quite right-brained and so it’s hard for me to outline my writing. I can do it best by talking to someone and then following the dots of our conversation. Luckily, I like to conclude or finish things once they are started so I’ll keep working until I have enough to feel like I know “which way the horse is going.” What I have noticed is that more left-brained writers outline easily and yet, sometimes, have a harder time making  their text sing with strong verbs, metaphors and poetic writing. Continue reading “Starting to Outline” »